Monday, September 2, 2013

How to Get the Body You Always Wanted, and Keep It.

2004
Today
So what am I holding in the "Today" photo?

That is the "Agreement to Participate in  a Research Study And Authorization for Use and Disclosure of Information" that I received from the The Miriam Hospital Weight Control & Diabetes Research Center.

Also known as:  The National Weight Control Registry.

The registry was formed to study people who have been successful at weight and fat loss long term.  Long term success is defined by the registry as a loss of at least 30 pounds that has been maintained for at least one year.

They do ask for photos as documentation, so here are the other two pictures I will be sending to show my results:
 


I do hope that they accept me into the study, because I have made it my life's work to do what I can to pass along what I have learned to anyone else who wants to make a permanent fat loss transformation.

There is so much "Noise" and contradictory information in the news and on the internet these days that it can seem overwhelming and futile to sort through the different diets, exercise programs, and even surgical procedures to find what works for long term fat loss.

Here's just one example of the contradictions we see when it comes to weight loss.

Here is the intro to an article by Mary MacVean of the Los Angeles Times:

"Earlier this week, researchers reported that skipping breakfast was linked to heart disease. A few days later comes word that skipping breakfast could be a good weight-loss strategy because people don’t make up for all those calories later in the day.
Should we tear our hair out in frustration? Or cozy up to the scrambled eggs?"
Mac Vean goes on to interview the author of the Breakfast Skipping Study: David Levitsky, a Cornell professor of nutritional sciences and psychology and the senior author of the breakfast and calories study.  

In the study student volunteers skipped breakfast, and they ended up eating an average of 408 fewer calories over the course of the day.  According to the calorie balance theory of eat less, move more and lose weight, that would make skipping breakfast a good strategy to help combat our national obesity crisis.

Luckily, being a fine reporter, Ms. MacVean asks Mr. Levitsky this question:

"What about people who won the weight battle – keeping off at least 30 pounds for a year or more -- and are part of the National Weight Control Registry? They eat breakfast."
Levitsky replied:

“You’re talking about the exceptions,” Levitsky said. Those people are not like most people: They are more health-conscious, they exercise more, they’re extraordinarily watchful over what they eat. “It’s dangerous to extrapolate from them,” he said.  (The emphasis is mine.)

Dangerous?  He called us dangerous?  Seriously?

As an individual who has qualified for the National Weight Control Registry I am outraged at being called dangerous.

Ok, I admit, I'm a little bit flattered too.

There's something exciting about being thought dangerous, as if I was some kind of Femme Fatale or something.  But no, I'm just a formerly chubby kid and obese middle aged mom who wanted health, and yes beauty, so badly that she was willing to change her whole life in order to get it.

Is it dangerous to do exercise you enjoy for 30 minutes three times a week?  Is is dangerous to dance or do yoga for three more hours during the week because you love it and it makes you feel fantastic and energized?

Speaking of energized, is it dangerous to eat a breakfast of organic eggs and vegetables cooked in Kerrygold butter every day?

Is is dangerous to eliminate sugar and grains from my diet because they trigger binges, and I don't want to binge ever again?

It may be dangerous to extrapolate from what I do each day to stay lean, but if you want leanness, and vitality, and you want to feel like your ideal authentic self (rail thinness is not required to qualify), maybe you might want to try what has worked so brilliantly for me.

Here is my affiliate link for Turbulence Training

This is the program that fueled my transformation, and that I am using in the 18th Turbulence Training Transformation Contest to help my students at Gordon Studio to transform their bodies as well.  Far from being dangerous, the program is safe, smart, effective, and it can work for you too.